Recent Kroc Faculty and Fellow Research Grants

2015-2016

Alison Rice (Romance Languages) received a grant to begin research in Paris on a new book project focusing on Francophone women writers and international human rights. Through filmed interviews, Rice will explore the ways in which acclaimed authors who are attentive to building peace within their oeuvre are also engaged in hands-on activism in different settings around the world.

Cat Bolten (Kroc Institute) was awarded a greant to investigate the social, medical, and ecological dynamics of the co-habitation of humans and wildlife in rural Sierra Leone.

Emmanuel Katongole (Kroc Institute) received a grant for his project “Who are My People?” Christianity, Non-Violence and Belonging in Eastern Africa.

Ann Mische (Kroc Institute) was awarded a grant her project “Futures in Contention: Projective Deliberation and Transformative Politics in the Global Arena.” 

Jason Springs (Kroc Institute) was awarded a grant for his project “Restorative Justice and the New Jim Crow.” 

2014-2015

Tanisha Fazal (Kroc Institute) received a grant to conduct a public opinion survey on U.S. voters’ responses to information about different types of war casualties.

Emmanuel Katongole (Kroc Institute) received a grant to do field research and a workshop on lament in the East African region. The findings from the research inform the manuscript, Born of Lament: The Theology and Politics of Hope in Africa.

Asher Kaufman (Kroc Institute) received a grant to conduct archival research in New York City as well as to support interviews of Israelis and Lebanese who were involved in the Israeli occupation of South Lebanon (1982-2000).

Olivier Morel (Film, Television, and Theatre) received a grant to support a book project, titled Homo Cinematicus, based on interviews with professionals from the media and film industries on the relationship between cinema and the performance of violence. 

2013 - 2014

Tanisha Fazal (Kroc Institute) received a grant to bring in a guest lecturer who had recently spent time on the Syrian-Turkish border and support a peace talks simulation in her class on civil wars.

Tanisha Fazal (Kroc Institute) received a grant to hold a workshop on her book manuscript on the unintended consequences of the proliferation of the laws of war.

Madjav Joshi (Kroc Institute) received a grant to collect and analyze data on more than 15,000 individual victims of violence in Nepal between 1996 and 2006, many of whom were victims of targeted killings. The grant will support research to quantify data on incident locations, timing, and individual characteristics of victims in order to allow deeper analysis of conflict and peacebuilding patterns.

Asher Kaufman (Kroc Institute) received a grant to hire an assistant to collect material for a research project on the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon.

John Paul Lederach (Kroc Institute) received a grant for the translation an article written by the Life and Peace Institute on peacebuilding and land issues in the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

Daniel Philpott (Kroc Institute) received a grant to create an online research tool that allows for a simultaneous search of Catholic social teaching documents and instruments of international human rights law. The project aims to bring Church teaching into conversation with international law, fostering interdisciplinary dialogue on human dignity and facilitating research on the Catholic Church’s understanding of human rights.

Emilia Justyna Powell (Political Science) received a grant for the Islamic law states and international law project, where she studies how Islamic law states view international law, in particular, international conflict management venues such as arbitration tribunals and international courts. With the support from the Kroc, she was able to travel to Jordan to meet with and interview Awn Al-Khasawneh, former Prime Minister of Jordan and the vice-President of the International Court of Justice. This grant supports research for her book project entitled: Islamic Law States and International Law: Peaceful Resolution of Territorial Disputes.

Mun'im Sirry (Kroc Institute) received a grant to support research on his project titled "In Search of Peaceful Coexistence in a Plural Society: An Indonesian Experience." This is a book-length research project exploring the conditions for the possibility of pluralist coexistence among diverse ethnic and religious communities in contemporary Indonesia.

2012-2013

E. Mark Cummings (psychology) received a grant to present research findings on children and political violence in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and Vukovar, Croatia, at the annual meeting of the International Society for Political Psychology at the Lauder School of government, Diplomacy and Strategy in Herzliya, Israel.

Madjav Joshi (Kroc Institute) received a grant to collect and analyze data on more than 15,000 individual victims of violence in Nepal between 1996 and 2006, many of whom were victims of targeted killings. The grant will support geocoding of the exact location and time of each incident to allow deeper analysis of conflict and peacebuilding patterns.

David Cortright (Kroc Institute) received a grant to support editorial work on historical records from the Fourth Freedom Forum to lay the groundwork for future research and publications. The records contain information on SANE and the Nuclear Weapons Freeze Campaign of the 1980s, the Win without War campaign before the second Iraq War, and nuclear disarmament after the Cold War.

John Paul Lederach (Kroc Institute) received a grant to support editorial and translation work on a volume, co-authored with recent doctoral candidate Laura Taylor, on participatory action research and strategic peacebuilding. The collaborative volume grew out of an earlier initiative at the Kroc Institute focused on peacebuilding apprenticeship.

Atalia Omer (Kroc Institute) received a grant to support research comparing solidarity activism in Chicago by the Tibetan and Palestinian diaspora communities. Through interviews with members of these communities, Omer will explore how religion relates to their narratives of displacement, return, and national revival and survival.

2011-2012

Kraig Beyerlein (sociology) received a Kroc grant to support the collection of data on protests, marches, and demonstrations in the United States as part of a research project to understand American public dissent.

Eileen Hunt Botting (political science) received a faculty fellow research grant to translate and incorporate historic Japanese, Korean, and Chinese perspectives into her forthcoming book on Mary Wollstonecraft, John Stuart Mill, and human rights.

E. Mark Cummings (psychology) received a grant for focus group research with Croat and Serb youth and mothers in Croatia. The study is part of a larger project on children and inter-ethnic conflict in Croatia.

Sandra Gustafson (English and American Studies) received a Kroc grant for a partial leave in 2013 to conduct research for a book on conflict and democracy in American fiction. She also will develop new graduate and undergraduate courses on literature and peace studies.

Madhav Joshi (peace studies) received a faculty research grant to build a dataset of victims of the Maoist insurgency in Nepal between 1996-2006.

Monika Nalepa (political science) received a faculty fellow research grant to acquire survey data from the Center for the Study of Public Opinion in Poland and to hire a Notre Dame student translator for research on political party institutionalization in nascent democracies.

Darcia Narvaez (psychology) received a Kroc grant for a research project to understand pathways to virtue development in children. Previous pilot projects have shown that peaceful character is strongly related to early life experiences.

2010-2011

Eileen Hunt Botting (political science) received a faculty fellow research grant to prepare a scholarly edition of Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman that will emphasize its political and philosophical sources and legacies. The book, first published in 1792, has become a classic of Western civilization.

Viva Bartkus (management) received a Kroc faculty fellow research grant for research conducted by Notre Dame MBA and peace studies master's students in conjunction with her class, Business on the Front Lines, which explores the role of business in postwar reconstruction efforts.

Mark Cummings (psychology) received a faculty fellow research grant for research in Croatia on the psychological impact of ethnic tensions on children and families. The research builds on a previous study in Northern Ireland.

Rev. Robert Dowd, C.S.C. (political science) received a Kroc faculty fellow research grant to assess the impact of strategies intended to encourage citizens to participate peacefully in Uganda's 2011 presidential/general election. The research involved a study of voting behavior of 1,200 households in Uganda.

2009-2010

Viva Bartkus (management) received a Kroc Faculty Fellow Research Grant for a project in which she and Notre Dame MBA students investigated the role of business in post-war reconstruction efforts in Lebanon, Uganda, and Kenya.

Larissa Fast (peace studies) received a Kroc Faculty Research Grant to develop asearchable global database of nonviolent events interfering with the delivery of emergency and developmental aid. The database is intended to improve security for those working to prevent and minimize the suffering caused by violence. 

Cynthia Mahmood (anthropology) received a Kroc Faculty Fellow Research Grant for a book on the Anabaptist roots of socialist-pacifist success in Reading, Pennsylvania. The research draws on documents and artifacts from Mahmood'd father, Elwood Keppley.

Daniel Philpott (political science and peace studies) received a Kroc Faculty Research Grant for a workshop on his manuscript "Just and Unjust Peace: an Ethic of Political Reconciliation."

2008-2009

Viva Bartkus (management) received a Faculty Fellow Research Grant for a project in which she and Notre Dame MBA students investigated the role of business in post-war reconstruction efforts in Bosnia and Lebanon.

Eileen Hunt Botting (political science) received a Faculty Fellow Research Grant to explore how Mary Wollstonecraft and John Stuart Mill, the leading philosophers of women's rights in the 19th century, contributed to the invention of feminism and its intersection with peace, labor, and human rights movements.

E. Mark Cummings (psychology) received a Faculty Fellow Research Grant for a study on the effects of political violence on children in Croatia, a continuation of a five-year project examining political violence on children in Northern Ireland. 

Michael Desch (political science) received a Faculty Fellow Research Grant to analyze the trends, causes, and consequences of the waning influence of academics on U.S. national security policy and offer guidance on how scholars and policymakers can engage each other on national security issues.

Debra Javeline (political science) was awarded a Faculty Associate Fellowship. She conducted field research in North Ossetia, Russia, for a book focusing on local responses to the violent siege on the Russian school in Beslan.

Sebastian Rosato (political science) received a Faculty Associate Fellowship to work on a book about the construction of the European Union, focusing on the causes of European integration and the wider debate among international relations scholars about the causes of war and peace. 

Ernesto Verdeja (political science and peace studies) received a Kroc faculty research grant for a workshop to bring together scholars of peace, democracy, and social movements and a book to advance thinking about global power relations, capitalism, and violent conflict around the world.

Todd Whitmore (theology) received a Faculty Associate Fellowship for work in Uganda on a book that explores the conditions under which people are willing to undertake risks, even to their own lives, in situations of armed conflict.

2007-2008

Asma Afsaruddin (classics) received a Faculty Fellow Research Grant for a study of jihad and martyrdom in Islamic thought and practice.

Rev. Bob Dowd, C.S.C. (theology) received a Faculty Research Grant to conduct fieldwork in Senegal to examine the extent to which participation in Christian and Islamic religious communities encourages or discourages participation in economic development, social welfare, and the wider political community.

Rev. Paul Kollman, C.S.C. (theology) received a Faculty Research Grant to visit early sites of evangelization in Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania to examine the historical roots of contemporary Christian realities in East Africa.

Maura Ryan (theology) was awarded a Faculty Associate Fellowship. She is exploring the intersection of gender, health, and armed conflict as an issue in Christian bioethics, drawing on epidemiological studies in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Naunihal Singh (political science) received a Faculty Research Grant to compile a dataset on military coup attempts since 1945 as part of a larger research project exploring why some coup attempts succeed and others fail.

2005-2006

Dan Lindley (political science) was awarded a Faculty Associate Fellowship for his project "Is War Rational?" The project assessed the extent to which miscalculation and misperception dominate decisions for war. He also completed research for his book Promoting Peace with Information: Transparency as a Tool of Security Regimes (Princeton University Press, 2007), which explores the idea that peacekeeping institutions such as the United Nations can reduce the risk of war by increasing transparency between adversaries.