Since the end of the Cold War, hundreds of accords, including 34 comprehensive peace agreements, have been signed by combatants engaged in armed conflicts around the world. Many have since collapsed into violent confrontation. Some have been followed by stalemate, economic struggle, and crime. Others have resulted in lasting peace. What makes the difference? How can we improve the chances that a peace process will succeed?

To help answer these and related questions, the Kroc Institute has established the Peace Accords Matrix (PAM), a unique source of comparable data on peace agreements. PAM allows scholars and practitioners to compare 51 different themes in all the comprehensive peace agreements signed since 1989. This interactive database was developed with support from the United States Institute of Peace and the National Science Foundation.

The database, in both qualitative and quantitative form, is now freely available on the PAM website. Current research efforts are investigating the partial peace accords which lead to a comprehensive peace agreement in order to determine how a peace process succeeds. In a related effort, researchers are also working to define the concept of "quality peace" — one that goes beyond the end of violence to include durable peace as the outcome of successful peace processes.

Faculty working in this area include:

David Cortright, PAM Manager, Director of Policy Studies
Madhav Joshi
, PAM associate director, research assistant professor
Jason Quinn
, PAM research assistant professor
Francisco Diez, PAM Regional Ambassador to Latin America
Laurel Stone,
PAM Project Coordinator, Program Manager of Policy Studies
John Paul Lederach,
PAM Strategic Advisor, professor of international peacebuilding