The November election results will have significant implications for U.S. international policy and the prospects for peace. In this issue we examine some of the challenges the new administration will face and the impact of past and future policy choices in relation to the war in Syria, debates about human rights and the use of torture, and the domestic consequences of the global war on terror for Muslims and other communities.

New posts in the December 2016 issue of Peace Policy:

David Cortright examines the obstacles to peace in Syria and the challenges the new administration will face in addressing the civil war and its consequences. More »

Jennifer Mason McAward reviews some of the human rights issues raised by the President-Elect’s campaign rhetoric and their possible policy impacts. More »

Perin Gurel comments upon the registration of Muslims and law enforcement action against racialized communities in the context of the War on Terror. More »

About Peace Policy

Peace Policy offers research-based insights, commentary, and solutions to the global challenge of violent conflict. Each issue features the writing of scholars and practitioners who investigate the causes of violent conflict and who seek to contribute to effective solutions and alternatives to the use of force.

Peace Policy is edited by David Cortright, director of policy studies at the Kroc Institute, dcortrig@nd.edu.

Visit the latest issue of Peace Policy at peacepolicy.nd.edu

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